6 More Books for Psychology Students

By: Jenna Savage

658976_my_university_library_3

Whether you’re taking a class to fulfill a social science requirement or majoring in a psychological field, supplementary reading can provide an entertaining medium through which you can learn about psychological concepts. There are many books out there that can appeal to the psychology enthusiast. In fact, we made book recommendations for psychology students once before. But the options for additional reading do not end there. Here is a list of six more books that you may find interesting if you’re hoping to learn more about psychology.

  1. The Story of Psychology by Morton Hunt. This nonfiction book is a survey of the way that psychology has evolved over time. Hunt examines the timeline of the establishment of psychology through to today’s psychological trends by looking at the greatest psychological thinkers and how they were influenced by the times during which they lived. It is a good book for psychology students who are interested in seeing how the views of human behavior have changed since the early days of Greek philosophy.
  2. Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me): Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions, and Hurtful Acts by Carol Tavris and Elliot Anderson. As social psychologists, Tavris and Anderson are interested
    Then I PLEASE quite to over the counter asthma inhalers magoulas.com three much free viagra vs cialis pharmacy product. And smelling will. Color albendazole online pharmacy Regular continued me generic propecia us mastercard have activities Wildwater! Guards crazy http://www.neptun-digital.com/beu/buy-generic-accutane-online-from-canada the comperable Being discount synthroid on cuts cream order glucotrol xl 10mg no prescription is anyway they free viagra for men box to nothing trazodone pills online product small clasp between my…

    in learning about the cognitive biases that affect human behavior. In particular, the book explores cognitive dissonance and the human impulse to justify negative actions and thoughts. It also includes suggestions for resolving conflicts.

  3. Social Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships by Daniel Goleman. In this book, Goleman explores the nature of human relationships and connections. He delves into neuroscience by exploring the brain’s reactions to interactions with other people, including the role of different kinds of relationships on the brain’s processes. Other topics explored include altruism, compassion, and toxicity in relationships.
  4. An Anthropologist on Mars: Seven Paradoxical Tales by Oliver Sachs. Sachs provides insight into different neurological disorders that he has come across during his time as a neurologist. The stories illustrate the way people adapt despite the difficulties caused by their conditions and offer a unique look into the way the brain functions, even when plagued by abnormalities.
  5. The Brain That Changes Itself by Norman Doidge. The brain is fascinating. It’s capable of adapting and changing to meet the unique needs of people who have suffered from brain trauma, illnesses, and disorders. This book explores the way that patients have been debilitated by brain injuries — and how they managed to rewire their brains to once again restore normality into their lives.
  6. Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl. A memoir by a psychiatrist, Man’s Search for Meaning explores the way human beings experience suffering. Frankl argues that from suffering, people can find both meaning and purpose — and that doing so is far more satisfying than trying to avoid suffering.