In Your State: Vermont

Psychology Degree Schools in Vermont

Address: 337 College Hill
Johnson, Vermont 05656-9464
Type: 4-year, Public
Accreditation Agency: New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Commission on Institutions of Higher Education
Psychology Degrees Offered: Bachelor of Arts in Psychology - Hybrid

How to Become a Psychologist in Vermont

How to Become a Psychologist in Vermont

Educational Requirements

To practice independently as a psychologist in Vermont, you must first obtain a license through the Vermont Board of Psychological Examiners. An important step in this process is obtaining either a doctoral or master’s degree in psychology, according to state law. Also required for licensure is acquiring 4,000 hours of supervised experience and passing state and national licensing exams. Graduate programs in psychology typically include course work in psychological assessment, intervention, psychopathology, statistical methods, and professional ethics, and include practicum experiences and internships where students learn skills under supervision. Doctoral programs commonly conclude with completion of a dissertation, a book-length document detailing the student’s original research of a relevant area in psychology.

The education requirements for school psychologists in Vermont are slightly different, and licensure in this specialty is governed by the Vermont Department of Education rather than the Vermont Board of Psychological Examiners. To obtain a school psychologist credential in Vermont, you must complete either a specialist degree or a doctoral degree in school psychology that is accredited by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), or you must complete a doctoral degree in school psychology that is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), according to the NASP. This breaks down to at least 60 graduate-level semester hours at the specialist level or at least 90 semester hours at the doctoral level, the NASP explains. School psychologists in Vermont also take a different national licensing exam than other psychologists. School psychology programs in Vermont typically include course work in child and adolescent psychopathology, roles and functions of school psychologists, and psychological assessment. They also incorporate practicum experiences and internships where students gain hands-on skills working with children and teens in school settings.

Continuing Education Requirements

Every two years, psychologists in Vermont must renew their license, and mandatory continuing education is built into the renewal process. Psychologists must complete 60 hours of continuing education (CE) to renew their license, and six of those hours must pertain to professional ethics in psychology, according to administrative rules set by the Board of Examiners. In addition, only 30 of those 60 hours may pertain to any one topic, the Board notes, ensuring psychologists stay abreast of a variety of topics. CE is vital to the psychology profession so that psychologists can stay up-to-date on best practices and advances in the field, thereby helping them provide high-quality psychological services to the public.

School psychologists also must complete continuing education. Level I school psychologists must complete three academic credits, or 45 hours of continuing professional development (CPD), and develop a seven-year professional development plan, according to the NASP. Level II school psychologists must complete nine academic credits, or 135 hours of CPD, within the seven-year licensure period. CPD in school psychology is specific to practicing psychology in school settings.

Psychology Licensure in Vermont

While there is only one level of psychology licensure in Vermont, the state does allow temporary licensure for psychologists who have obtained licensure in another state or a Canadian province, or for in-state psychologist trainees who are in the process of completing their year of postdoctoral supervised practice. School psychologists have two licensure levels. Here we’ve summed up the education, exam, and work experience requirements for each type of licensure.

  • Licensed Psychologist
    • Education: Doctoral degree or master’s degree in psychology
    • Exam: EPPP, Jurisprudence Exam
    • Work Experience: 4,000 hours of supervised practice, 2,000 of which must be postdoctoral
    • Other Prerequisites: Must be at least 18 years old
  • Temporary Psychologist
    • Education: Doctoral degree in psychology is standard in most states
    • Exam: Varies by state, as this type of license is for psychologists who have met the requirements for licensure in another state. At the very least, the EPPP will be required
    • Work Experience: Varies by state, as this type of license is for psychologists who have met the requirements for licensure in another state. However, two years of supervised experience is standard in most states
    • Other Prerequisites: This license allows psychologists from other states to practice in Vermont for no more than 10 days, or 80 hours, in any 12-month period, provided you have no disciplinary history and are in good standing to practice psychology; you may not be issued more than two temporary licenses
  • Psychologist Trainee
    • Education: Doctoral degree or master’s degree in psychology
    • Exam: EPPP, Jurisprudence Exam
    • Work Experience: Psychologist trainees are typically in the process of completing their required postdoctoral supervised practice
  • School Psychologist (Level I License)
    • Education: Specialist degree or doctoral degree in school psychology
    • Exam: Praxis II with a passing score of 165, unless you have obtained a doctoral degree in school psychology that is accredited by either the NASP or the APA
    • Work Experience: NASP-approved or APA-accredited internship, or any other supervised internship that consists of at least 600 clock hours in a school or related education setting with students
    • Other Prerequisites: Valid for three years
  • School Psychologist (Level II Professional Educator’s License)
    • Education: Specialist degree or doctoral degree in school psychology
    • Exam: None beyond what is necessary to obtain a Level I license
    • Work Experience: Three years of practice under a Level I license
    • Other Prerequisites: 45 CPD hours; submission of an approved Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP) that explains your professional development goals for the upcoming licensure period; verification from a supervising administrator who can vouch that you are performing at a professional level; documentation of any required licenses or credentials

Salaries for Psychologists in Vermont

The average yearly salary for clinical, counseling, and school psychologists in Vermont was $65,210, as of May 2011, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Keep in mind, however, that BLS statistics should not be taken as guarantees of actual salary, which can differ greatly depending on a psychologist’s experience, location, and employer or client base. Entry-level psychologists often start out earning a lower salary and gradually increase their salary as they gain experience and build their client base.